Vol. 5 Num. 6
Covey Rise

Vol. 5 Num. 6

Covey Rise

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OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE

Upland hunting in the rugged West offers special challenges and rewards. In this issue we get three perspectives on hunting; chukar in sagebrush country, Hungarian partridge in Wyoming, and Valley quail in California. In these tales of hard slogging and hearty humor, we’re reminded that camaraderie is often the real prize of a hunt. For more on these fast-paced adventures check out “California Road Birds,” Ben Williams’ column “A View From the Top,” and Reid Bryant’s “Of Men and Dogs.” Shane Mahoney also reminds us that conservation practices, no matter how small, are key to preserving our wildlife and upland habitat—so that we can enjoy those adventures for many years to come.

Covey Rise often celebrates classics that improve with age—for example, a well-seasoned cast iron pan. In this issue’s food feature, a couple of experts sing the praises of this versatile cookware and provide recipes that will have you reaching for yours. Spirits guru Fred Minnick finds sublime flavors—and surprising value—in long-aged Scotch, while wine columnist Karen McNeil plumbs the appeal of age-worthy Syrahs and finds robust versions from arid eastern Washington and Oregon, perfect for pairing with game. Writer Chuck Holland examines another ideal match, cigars and dominoes.

Some classics can hardly be improved—witness the traditional leather-and-oak gun case crafted in this issue’s installment of our best gun series, a case developed long ago to transport guns destined to hunt in every corner of the British Empire. But as our story on Krieghoff shows, even a century-old gunmaker can smartly use high-tech tools to enhance traditional methods. 

We spend time with the largest and one of the oldest of spaniels, the Irish water spaniel, known for its curly coat and lively temperament. Doc Blythe writes fondly of another dog with personality, a cockeyed canine who went into overdrive at the sound of a shotgun. Of course, no dog is more of a character than our own Frank, who addresses his owner’s flaws and delusions with total, er, frankness. After all, if your best friend won’t tell you, who will?


Cover image by Travis Gillet, Courtesy of Filson