Issues

Vol. 5 Num. 3
Vol. 5 Num. 3
Covey Rise

Vol. 5 Num. 3

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APRIL - MAY 2017 ISSUE

Covey Rise is, in many ways, a testament to dogs. Hunting and bird dogs, certainly, but the larger population of dogs that accessorize our dens, co-pilot our trucks, offer quiet counsel on early-morning walks, and wait patiently beside the highchair while the baby finishes eating. Dogs are an important part of our lives, and we celebrate them in this issue from beginning to end. From an On Point snapshot of some of the upland breeds to a feature on pudelpointers to Doc’s recounting of his beloved Charbaby, you might say we’ve gone to the dogs. And in case you find yourself thinking about a puppy, our canine correspondent Frank reminds us that puppy picking is a two-way street.

Fear not, though, because we continue our quest to bring you the best the upland world has to offer, including the next installment of our series on bespoke shotguns and a visit to Wickett & Craig, one of the last remaining vegetable-based leather tanneries in the U.S. To enjoy the finer things in context, we travel to Gilchrist Club, in the heart of Old Florida, for some traditional bobwhite hunting and visit Fixe, an Austin, Texas eatery known for both their biscuits and their honey badgers, beverages that mix bourbon and honey in determined fashion. Following the story on that cocktail napkin, we propose a road trip in pursuit of American distilleries and visit with the family behind the iconic Pappy Van Winkle line of bourbons while enjoying a few days afield at Duval Plantation in South Carolina.

Along the way we bring you insights on the fundraising efforts behind conservation, an educated look at the maduro cigar wrapper, and an upland retrospective that brings past and future together in ways that compel us to embrace the present. All the while, we make every effort to envelop you in the upland traditions we celebrate. Thanks for joining us.

Cover image by Bill Buckley

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Vol. 5 Num. 2
Vol. 5 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 5 Num. 2

$ 8.00

FEBRUARY - MARCH 2017 ISSUE

February and March can be brutally cold, so in this issue we spend some time by the fire, reflecting on the grand adventure that is the upland hunting lifestyle. 

For starters, how about a little snipe hunting in the far reaches of Scotland, a place so remote even the snipe get lost. To warm your cockles after that coastal adventure, we’ll settle in by the fire to forge some barrels for the next installment of our series on London Best shotguns, page 54. Crossing the pond, we’ll take a closer look at the story behind Kevin’s, one of North America’s premier upland retailers and purveyor of fine shotguns, beginning on page 62.

After all the travel, you’ll no doubt be hungry, so we’ll dive deep into the heart of New Orleans for some local fare and neighborhood feel. Find Big Taste in the Big Easy on page 72. We might even finish dinner off with a nice rum, an all but forgotten upland spirit, and a reminder that, where cigars are concerned, size matters.

As we gather around the fire pit to swap stories and tell lies, we’ll look at conservation through the eyes of kids on their first pheasant hunt, and then we’ll take an adult look at the first decade of successful conservation efforts of Quail Coalition. Find those on pages 80 and 88, respectively. We’ll hunt over Munsterlanders, explore artistic expression through carved feathers, and even get a dog’s take on puppy love. Find it on page 46.

So stoke the fire, freshen the beverage, and send the dog for the slippers. Tell the world to step aside for a moment. There will be plenty of time for mortgages and power bills tomorrow. Today, right now, is Covey Rise time. Welcome. We’re glad you’re here. 

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Vol. 5 Num. 1
Vol. 5 Num. 1
Covey Rise

Vol. 5 Num. 1

$ 8.00

DECEMBER - JANUARY 2017 ISSUE

 

As the wingshooting seasons continue to unfold this year into next, we move deeper into the experience of traditions that bind us to the elements we love about the sport. We’re part of a collective, members of the international wingshooting tribe, and the gear and shotguns we use and clothes we wear announce our identities.

 

For one family and their well-known business, these outdoor traditions stretch over generations and are passed along to and nurtured among family members—and shared with customers worldwide. We’re speaking of The Orvis Company, at which the latest generation of Perkins brothers join their father, uncle, and grandfather in helping to define and refine what it means to love the outdoors lifestyle. Based amid Vermont’s Green Mountains, Orvis is the longest-running mail-order business in the United States, founded in 1856 in Manchester, Vermont. Please see our feature, “Family Ties.” 

 

We delve further into traditions with our continuing series on best London shotguns, and introduce the Covey Rise Gentleman’s Shotgun currently being built in the UK. In this issue, best London shotgun authority Chris Batha begins to tell us how the guns are manufactured, with specific descriptions of how the action comes together. This gunmaking process has changed little since the 1800s. Which fact also is very much true for gamekeeping, a profession that endures at estates throughout the UK. First and foremost, the gamekeeper is responsible for the health and perpetuation of wildlife on the estates, especially gamebirds. As the author Roger Catchpole writes, it’s part art, and part science.

 

US hunters—particularly those in the Northeast, Midwest, and along the Atlantic Coast, where woodcock are found—will be delighted to learn about woodcock shooting in the UK, specifically on Harris in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. The birds migrate through these UK Western Isles just as they do through parts of the US on their journey from summers in Canada and the northern states to wintering grounds in the Southeast.

Our “Conservation” department this time is about the recovery of snipe, a close cousin of woodcock though snipe tend to inhabit marshy lowlands or meadow wetlands. The author, Chris Madson, writes about his own lifelong reverence for these birds, and shares the great news about their recovery. Enjoy making and reflecting upon your own upland traditions throughout the seasons.

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Vol. 4 Num. 6
Vol. 4 Num. 6
Covey Rise

Vol. 4 Num. 6

$ 8.00

OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2016 ISSUE

Passions are running high as American wingshooting seasons open and we begin our annual endeavors afield with bird dogs, shotguns, and friends. The triggers of memories are often such stimuli as the smells of the Midwestern and Western prairies, the shady canopy of Northeastern wooded coverts, or the wiry grasses of Southeastern quail fields. This year, we’ll return again to make new memories in our favorite upland locations, reliving our time afield in after-hunt appreciations (see “Toasting the Hunt” and “One Cigar at a Time” in this issue for the proper accompaniments) and revisited in our imaginations in future seasons.

You can begin your exploration now in our October-November issue. First, journey through the quail fields of George Hi Plantation in North Carolina, where the habitat and quail hunting have undergone transformation in recent years. Go there and you can survey the sights from the back of a horse-drawn wagon, until the dogs go on point and it’s your turn to shoulder the shotgun you brought with you. 

Or maybe this is the year to buy a new shotgun. May we suggest a bespoke best London gun? Writer Chris Batha contributes a fascinating and entertaining introduction to best guns, the evolution of their handmade manufacture, and why you should consider one. See “London Best” on page 52. Now for that other element of a prized upland hunt: the bird dog. This time, we visit Pine Shadows in north-central Minnesota to learn more about their Haglin English springer spaniels. Spaniels appear in literature going back to the 14th Century, and to maintain the integrity of this classic sporting breed to this day, Mark and Sophie Haglin, owners of Pine Shadows, adopted a policy of customer care, respect, integrity, and honesty. Their Haglin spaniels are arguably the top springers working today.

The upland lifestyle is international, of course, and the journey continues in this issue to Argentina and New Zealand. Back in the US, we harmonize uniquely American bluegrass music with South Dakota prairie grass and the pheasant that hide there. These and other stories capture the upland journey in this issue, and we hope you enjoy them all.
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Vol. 4 Num. 5
Vol. 4 Num. 5
Covey Rise

Vol. 4 Num. 5

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In planning each issue of Covey Rise, we particularly embrace one word, a word that informs so much of the upland lifestyle: That word is bespoke, or custom-made or made to order.

We’ve shared stories with you on bespoke shotguns (and do so again in the August-September issue), apparel, culinary creations, walking sticks, vehicles, and much more. This time, we add timepieces to that roster and the Montana Watch Company. In “Keeping Time in Montana” read about Jeffrey Nashan and his family producing bespoke wristwatches in their Livingston, Montana, shop. Their watches capture the essence of why a wristwatch is such an expression of personal character.

About the bespoke shotguns in this issue: In 1880, John Dickson the third began planning what’s known as the Dickson round-action shotgun by taking out patents on the gun’s unique design. The trigger plate configuration allows the attractive round action on bespoke Dickson and MacNaughton shotguns (and guns from a few other manufacturers). For nearly 150 years, John Dickson & Son in Edinburgh, Scotland, has been a lead purveyor of this style of shotgun. We share the company’s history.

In each issue, we include what we call a Chef + Plate feature, and this time we visit Chef Dean Fearing in Dallas. Chef Fearing oversees the homegrown and surprising menu—Texas food without borders, he calls it—at Fearing’s Restaurant at the Ritz Carlton in Uptown Dallas. 

Athletic travel teams such as Little League or soccer are mobilizing to go on the road to away games—these teams are a uniting source of pride for many communities: Player families and the community at large rally around supporting the young athletes in their quest for excellence and good sportsmanship. But what about a team of retrievers and their owners on a travel schedule to hunt pheasant and other upland game? Read about it in “Travel Ball for Retrievers,” and the Wildrose Way, in this issue.

Finally, how often have we imagined our hunting partners, our beloved canines, sharing conversations with us, joining in to let us know what’s on their minds? Check out “Let Me Be Perfectly Frank” to get an entertaining dose of that reality.

Learn about an incomparable Texas quail hunt, spruce grouse in Montana’s Yaak Valley, evaluating bourbons and strong cigars, and why to consider tying fishing flies with gamebird feathers—and more in the August-September 2016 issue.  
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Vol. 4 Num. 4
Vol. 4 Num. 4
Covey Rise

Vol. 4 Num. 4

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JUNE - JULY 2016

All wingshooters get a special thrill from seeing, holding, or shooting a best gun. These are works of art as well as highly functional tools of our passions. In the June-July issue, we meet stocker, a sculptor of wood who creates the beautiful stocks on best-quality guns: his name is Paul Hodgins. Born and raised in the UK and living and working now in the US in Logan, Utah, Hodgins was part of a unique apprentice program at Holland & Holland that he joined in 1973 at age 16. There, he had intense training and acquired the skills to become a stocker, or a “sculptor” of finely finished wood on best shotguns. Read “Sculpting Wood” by Greggory Elliott and you’ll have an even greater appreciation for the craftsmanship that goes into a best gun.

More on the best of the best takes you to Longpine Plantation outside of Thomasville, Georgia, for a story on a special-invitation quail hunt from Covey Rise’s back-page columnist Dr. John C. Blythe. Though a son of the South and a lifelong quail hunter, Doc Blythe had never hunted truly wild quail on a private plantation—before being invited behind the gates of Longpine, as he writes, “a nearly 6,000-acre savanna of towering longleaf pines and open fields. It presents one of the most unique and picturesque sites a quail hunter can imagine. Add to that a wagon pulled by a brace of Clydesdales, hunters mounted on Tennessee Walking Horses, pointers rigid on point—and you have a picture almost too ideal to be real.” 

The very best of driven shooting, in the classic European tradition but offered now in the Teton Valley of Idaho—that means a trip with Blixt & Company. We take you there for a special Blixt Sporting Days outing and a simulated driven shoot, where guns (as shooters are called) aim for clay targets released to simulate driven pheasant and red-legged partridge, which are flushed overhead of the guns in erratic and very high flights—challenging shooting, indeed. One return participant of Blitx shoots, Roger Sanger, sums it up about the program started by Lars and Jen Magnusson: “Lars and Jen are trying to uphold the heritage, for example, with necktie and breeks for gentlemen. They haven’t tried to ‘Americanize’ the sport. Many of us like that, it gives you a different feel. You can’t use an automatic or a pump gun, for safety and also because of tradition. Only a two-barrel gun is allowed, for safety and for the sport of it.”

The best . . . we continue with that theme in our vehicle review of the Range Rover Sport, quite possibly the very best “gun bus” you’ll ever drive. Gun bus is the British term for the transport at an estate shoot, often a repurposed military vehicle that carries a group of guns to the shooting grounds. But not the posh Range Rover Sport—it offers first-class comfort, with exceptional performance. The author, Silvio Calabi, quotes the vehicle company’s chief program engineer Stuart Frith on what he is proudest of about the RRS: “(Frith) thought a moment and then said, with British understatement, ‘It’s the way the vehicle seems to stretch the laws of physics.’”

Let’s not forget food, glorious food, done Covey Rise style—Managing Editor Miles DeMott takes us to a memorable meal at Peninsula Grill, an anchor venue in the fantastic Planters Inn, in Charleston, South Carolina. Miles writes: “Planters Inn reinvented a corner and plowed new life into what is now thought to be the most expensive dirt in all of South Carolina. Nice work if you can get it. Essential to this effort has been the companion restaurant, Peninsula Grill.” Chef Graham Dailey plans his menu with creative intent, but he’s vigilant about the restaurant’s business, as well. Join Miles, and Chef Dailey, on an artistic vigil, in Charleston.

Plus, an African gamebird safari, a profile of an incredibly talented artist, our expanded Sportsman’s Bookshelf, and our regular columns and departments.

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Vol. 4 Num. 3
Vol. 4 Num. 3
Covey Rise

Vol. 4 Num. 3

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Vol. 4 Num. 3 – April/May 2016

Finding a sense of place: part of the appeal of being in the outdoors is finding the places that feel right, that feel natural, that feel like home. In our April-May issue, we introduce you to people and places you’ll want to know about and visit, starting with a ranch-brokerage firm in the West that can help you find your new homeplace in one of nine Western states in which they’re licensed to do real-estate business—Live Water Properties, with headquarters in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Live Water understands what sportsmen and women want in a ranch property.

Finding a fit in the outdoors can happen even when you hunt without a gun, as author Paul Fersen shares in “Hunting as a Picker-up.” Fersen works as a picker-up or dog handler on driven-bird shoots in the US, and delights in watching the action and helping to harvest the downed birds.

Sometimes a lodge does everything just right and you know you’ve found a special place. Near the Georgia coast, Dorchester Shooting Preserve is one such place, with well-managed habitat that’s home to fast-flying quail.

In South America, La Estancia de Cafayate is a luxury retreat that offers majestic views of the Andes Mountains, excellent locally-produced wines, horseback riding, and challenging golf—all proximate to some of the world’s best wingshooting in the country’s Salta region.

 

International travelers will find a hunter’s home in the midst of the City of Light, namely Paris’s Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature or Museum of Hunting and Nature. Read in this issue about the museum’s history and its collections.

A showcase of every adventure is a well-prepared meal. Chef Scott Leysath is known as The Sporting Chef because he brings game to the table that he’s personally gathered and he cooks it up deliberately. Learn some of his culinary specialties.

Single-barrel bourbons, cigars, canine products, a new “Conservation” department, and more in April-May 2016.
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Vol. 4 Num. 2
Vol. 4 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 4 Num. 2

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Vol. 4 Num. 2 – February/March 2016

For several issues reaching back to early 2015, Covey Rise has brought to our readers insider looks at incredible outdoors products and the people who make them. Several converge in the February-March 2016 issue—and the first such story is on a great man who has made his mark on working-dog training for centuries. Delmar Smith has an authentic approach to getting to know a dog’s mind—molding it like an artist molds a lump of clay—and helping to shape the dog’s behavior. “To train like a pro, you have to think like a dog,” Delmar says.

Next, we learn how Russell Moccasin has made one-of-a-kind, made-to-order footwear for decades from their workshop in Berlin, Wisconsin.

David McKay Brown is a skilled and talented craftsman making best guns under his name in Scotland. We visit his workshop to behold his beautiful guns.

The Georgia artist Bucky Bowles makes inviting and authentic paintings, transporting viewers into each scene—in other words, he is constantly “Painting the Familiar,” which is the title of our feature on Bucky and his work.

Chef Sean Finley of The High Adventure Company makes memorable meals in exquisite upland-hunting settings. We check in with him at Cheyenne Ridge in South Dakota to learn his approach to great food (and we share his recipes!).

Make your own memories by living the upland lifestyle with Covey Rise
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Vol. 4 Num. 1
Vol. 4 Num. 1
Covey Rise

Vol. 4 Num. 1

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Vol. 4 Num. 1 – December/January 2016

Gathering our news of the world from a nightly network television broadcast has long been a fact of daily living in America, through generations. For many years, either from a network studio or broadcasting from the field, Tom Brokaw has been our evening information anchor. Covey Rise spent a weekend in the pheasant fields of South Dakota at Paul Nelson Farm last fall with Mr. Brokaw, a native son of South Dakota and longtime pheasant hunter 

From a personality profile on an inspiring man and hunting devotee to a gun profile of generational significance, we share another exciting feature written by Miles DeMott, about a Stevens shotgun passed down to young hunters-to-be.  

The Continental Field Trials hosted by Florida’s Dixie Plantation are the epicenter for top-level bird-dog competition, and have been for decades. Barbara Teare writes about the Plantation’s history and Field Trials’ important role in setting the bar for the ongoing improvement of the dog breeds. 

Nancy Anisfield takes her German shorthaired pointers—trained on hunting birds in the Northeast’s dense upland coverts—to discover pheasant and other game on Castle Valley Lodge’s wide open 14,000 acres.  

 And we embark on a driven shoot in the UK with prominent sporting-travel hosts Bettws Hall, written by author and shotgun expert Chris Batha.  

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Vol. 3 Num. 6
Vol. 3 Num. 6
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Vol. 3 Num. 6

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Vol. 3 Num. 6 – October/November 2015

Access to nearly 6,000 acres along the South Carolina coast, with fishing and wingshooting and use of all amenities, plus residential ownership of an acre of land, the October-November 2015 of Covey Rise welcomes our readers to the shared plantation concept of Brays Island.  Located outside of Savannah, Georgia, Brays Island Plantation is a private home for families who love the outdoors: fresh – or saltwater fishing, wingshooting, target shooting, equestrian sports, golf, tennis, and much more.

Further south, Romona Brumby of Atlanta’s The London Trading Company handpicks clothes and accessories from around the world. We explore the unique concepts and “personal shopper” approach to her store.

As we take a look at our favorite sporting dogs, author Nancy Anisfield takes an in-depth look into the Weimaraners breed that are known for their tracking ability speed, courage, and durability – and their drive to find gamebirds.

Drawing from a lifetime of outdoor experience, Chef Chris Hastings prepares locally sourced food that’s synced with the seasons, honoring the place and traditions of the past.  We sit down with Hastings as he tells us stories of his childhood summers in South Carolina and his inspirations to begin his field to table concept. 

We take a look at the handmade works of art over which Italian gunmakers Remigio and Elio Bertuzzi worked together to create a unique shotgun and an exclusive opportunity.  In contrast, crafting from a different texture, Montana sculptor Liz Lewis produces bronze sculpture with sporting and wildlife themes.

Writer Sydney Lea gives an ode to the Main woods in autumn and celebrates the history of the state’s sporting camps.  Will this become your new hunting grounds for the Fall?

Wherever the art and passion of your hunting experiences may take you, we hope that Covey Rise continues to enrich and fulfill you with knowledge and new occurrences.

 

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Vol. 3 Num. 5
Vol. 3 Num. 5
Covey Rise

Vol. 3 Num. 5

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Vol. 3 Num. 5 – August/September 2015

The Covey Rise team continues to travel to all corners of the world in the August-September issue 2015 of Covey Rise.  We start our travels with author, Tom Keer who discusses the experiences of Wild Wing Lodge and Kennel in Upland Kentucky and the lodges’ thriving bird populations in a healthy habitat as well as providing exceptional dog kennels.  We also traveled along the Kentucky River to the Buffalo Trace Distillery, which continues to make bourbon that sets a standard of excellence in taste and the community motto, “Honor Tradition, Embrace Change” is strongly shown through the passion and elegance of its bourbon.

Up next, author Everett Potter takes us to a mountain paradise at the Yellowstone Club, a sportsman’s year-round playground set on about 14,000 acres of land.  Featured in this story is professional golfer Tom Weiskopf, who has turned his considerable talents to golf course design into a stunning mountain golf course experience at Yellowstone Club.

Next, the Covey Rise staff travelled to Hawick, Scotland to stop at the home of tweed and reveal how this historic fabric is made today, just as it was two hundred years ago.  Dating back to 1882, Lovat Mill is the sole producer of tweed in Hawick, weaving and operating at the mill 24-hours, to keep their business vibrant.  Computerized looms from Germany at Lovat Mill operate at speeds that will be dizzying to previous generations of tweed makers.  

In Spain, Covey Rise, along with Spanish gun makers Aguirre and Aranzabal, celebrate one hundred years of making fine shotguns and the preservation of the Basque firearms industry.

In a South Carolina church in the early 1900s, a stray dog became the foundation of the Boykin spaniel breed.  Over time, the Boykins’ reputation has reached into the upland side of hunting.  Tolerant of hot weather, the dogs are especially popular in dove and quail fields.  Is this the right dog for you?

Additionally in South Carolina, Chef Sean Brock brings panache to his four Southern restaurants and into your kitchen through his new book Heritage that speak to Southern culinary pride and Brock’s beginnings in rural Virginia.

Ultimately, traveling helps Covey Rise celebrate the entire sporting lifestyle experience.  Where will we travel to next?  Be sure to check out the October/November issue to see where Covey Rise will take you next!

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Vol. 3 Num. 4
Vol. 3 Num. 4
Covey Rise

Vol. 3 Num. 4

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Vol. 3 Num. 4 – June/July 2015

As summer’s heat sets in, we begin to focus on the dog-training schedule. Running and working our dogs becomes an early morning endeavor or happens just before dark when the heat has subsided here in the South.  The focus is solely on training the dogs and watching these remarkable companions adapt to our requests and commands.

Robert G. Wehle spent his life raising and training exceptional dogs. He bred Elhew English pointers for more than 60 years and his bloodline of dogs became known in the reverse of his last name—Elhew.   In our feature “The Elhew Legacy,” we share with you the exciting next steps in this working-dog-breeding history.

In this issue, a new writer for Covey Rise, Miles DeMott, discusses prescribed burning— the danger and beauty of it, and the rewards of renewing habitat.

Writer Roger Catchpole takes Covey Rise on a spectacular UK grouse shoot with Atkin Grant and Lang Sporting at Coverhead Moor in North West England.

We also hope you enjoyed our first “Handmade” feature in the last issue. The value of how bespoke products are made is in the intricate details and the care, time, and effort that go into producing something. Just like making a fine shotgun, walking sticks made for the UK moorland terrain have a story behind the finished product. We’re sure you share our thoughts that learning about the process is as intriguing as the finished product is. We are excited to uncover these stories in the issues to come through our “Handmade” features. 

Writer Tom Keer enjoys a memorable shooting experience with Burt Spiller’s Parker while the Covey Rise team discusses Purdey’s traditional British walking sticks and their artistic flair to create products of artisanal value that showcase excellence and quality.  And we can’t forget about the quality of culinary expertise from Chef Scott Ostrander, who conjures quality at the Red Stage Grill in Asheville, North Carolina who spices up the kitchen with quail and waffles.

We have another unique piece to Covey Rise in this issue. Silvio Calabi travels to a Northeast hunt inside a Ferrari. Check out the case he makes to convince his spouse to own one—maybe it will work for you? Covey Rise celebrates the entire sporting lifestyle, and sometimes how you get to the sport is as enjoyable as the hunt itself.

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Vol. 3 Num. 3
Vol. 3 Num. 3
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Vol. 3 Num. 3

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Vol. 3 Num. 2 - April/May 2015

True artists make life more pleasing and pleasurable, often simply by making us feel happier and better about ourselves through their art. Whether we gaze at framed art hanging on the wall, wear it on our backs, store it in a gun case, serve it for dinner, or appreciate it surrounding us while at a lodge—Covey Rise offers up stories on each in our April-May 2015 issue.

First is a visit to Hageman Reserve in Texas, a new private-club frontier offering top-quality accommodations in an opulent, 65,000 square foot lodge that resembles a French chateau. The Hageman family’s guiding principle is leave it better than you found it—and they’ve endeavored to create a sporting club that has guests feeling immersed in an artistic environment—with top-flight wingshooting of course.

Bespoke clothes made at the expert hands of a Savile Row trained tailor such as Leonard Logsdail transform your wardrobe into functional art. “The process begins with a meeting in Leonard’s comfortable fitting room in New York to discuss needs, wants, and style, and to browse among 12,000 fabrics,” writes Silvio Calabi, author of our feature. “A two-piece suit starts at $6,500 and can be double that, depending on fabrics and features.” But what an investment! As Silvio writes, “It’s also true that you’ll never be satisfied with something less.”

Wearing such clothes makes you want to hold and shoot a shotgun of value, of course. Learn how to start a collection of fine double guns in Greggory Elliott’s “Become a Collector” in this issue. 

In “Travels with Easel” we journey into the world of en plein air painter Chris (C. D.) Clarke. “I paint the things that are important to me and that I truly enjoy. I don’t have a career so much as I have a lifestyle,” says C. D.

All this appreciating art really does build up an appetite—and Chef Charlie Palmer comes through with fantastic recipes to please any palate. Marinated Spatchcocked Quail, anyone? There’s art in that entreé, for sure!

Buy the Issue and read more!

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Vol. 3 Num. 2
Vol. 3 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 3 Num. 2

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Vol. 3 Num. 2 – February/March 2015

Elvis is the king . . . of the quail fields at Sinkola Plantation in Thomasville, Georgia, that is. Covey Rise introduces readers to an cocker spaniel with loads of personality—Elvis. When he’s not the family dog of the Kirkhams at Sinkola, sleeping at the foot of the bed, he’s riding poised in a quail wagon ready to flush or retrieve bobwhites. Read more in “Finding Elvis.” (By the way, that’s Elvis on the issue’s cover!)

We journey next to northcentral Idaho and Flying B Ranch in Kamiah. Recipient of the Orvis Wingshooting Lodge of Year (twice, actually), visit and stay there and you’ll know why! Recreational choices abound—hunting for chukar, pheasant, partridge, and in the “offseason” a chance to fish for Clearwater River steelhead. And don’t overlook taking advantage of the facilities to train your canine companion through the spring and summer months.

International travel is on tap, too, in this issue. Guayascate is a lodge in Argentina at which you can indulge your shooting passions and soothe your soul, as writer Roger Catchpole informs us. And in this issue check out La Porteñita, a nearby lodge, as well!

Rust never sleeps and neither should you when it comes to cleaning your prized investment of sporting shotguns. Gregg Elliott takes you through a master class on gun cleaning, with the techniques and tools to do a thorough job. 

And for some spiritual uplift, read about fine artist Gordon Allen and spent some time appreciating his incredible artwork. 

Similarly, enjoy the culinary uplift of Christopher Kostow in “Portrait of An Artist.” Kostow is the inspired chef at The Restaurant at Meadowood in California’s Napa Valley. His recipes, and his book A New Napa Cuisine, will introduce new culinary horizons.

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Vol. 3 Num. 1
Vol. 3 Num. 1
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Vol. 3 Num. 1

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Vol. 3 Num. 1 – December/January 2015
From the Publisher: “As I travel back across the country from Seattle to Alabama, I can’t stop thinking about the past month’s adventures. What a great pleasure it was for me to spend several days walking the hillsides and watching and listening to a wise teacher. At times, I actually had to remind myself I was in the great outdoors to hunt wild birds. You see, this was like opening a history book on life, dogs, birds, and fly fishing—just to name a few subjects. Ben O. Williams is a legend in the outdoor world and it was an honor to walk alongside of him in the Montana fields he has hunted for more than 60 years. This is one trip I will never forget. Ben, don’t ever stop teaching life lessons to your students. When I mount my gun, I promise I will try and keep my head down and get my left hand far out on the gun’s fore end!

I truly love the sporting lifestyle and all it has to offer. It has been a wonderful fall, with the leaves changing and cooler temperatures settling in. As we prepare for the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, let’s stop, slow down, and give thanks for the many blessings we all enjoy. As you relax and relish the holiday feasts and time with family, I hope you will enjoy the start of year three for Covey Rise.” 

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Vol. 2 Num. 6
Vol. 2 Num. 6
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Vol. 2 Num. 6

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Vol. 2 Num. 6 -October/November 2014
From the Publisher: “It’s always sad to say goodbye to summer, but I’m ready for fall, as I’m sure you are—cooler weather, bird dogs on point, and new adventures outdoors. I hope you’ve made time to get your dogs in shape and have polished up your shooting this summer.

We have arranged an exciting season-opening issue for you. First, we start on the Southeast Coast with a fantastic quail hunt at Cabin Bluff. Then we cross the pond and visit Barbour and learn a little about their clothing, which we all love. Next, we spend some time visiting with Simon Clode as he sets the mark high for handmade best guns at Westley Richards. Nancy Anisfield gives us some insight into the Gordon setter, and Bob Bertram shows us what great talent looks like, through his paintings. We also head into the hills of Tennessee and meet with Chef Joseph Lenn at Blackberry Farm, which everyone wants to visit and now we know why!

We are thrilled to include cigars in our lineup, for the first time. Joe Healy, our editor, introduces us to cigars in our newest column, “One Cigar at a Time.” The magazine’s team is excited to add this section and we hope you will enjoy it as we begin to talk all things cigar.” 

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Vol. 2 Num. 5
Vol. 2 Num. 5
Covey Rise

Vol. 2 Num. 5

$ 8.00

Vol. 2 Num. 5 -August/September 2014
From the Publisher: “As we all get ready for the fresh aroma of autumn air, sit back and enjoy this issue of Covey Rise. We have a superb feature on the classic breed, the English setter, that you are sure to enjoy. We take a trip to North Carolina to hunt in excellent quail habitat and enjoy plantation traditions, and we behold the fine art of Italian shotgun engravers. Dale C. Spartas takes us farther along the road as he heads into Alberta, Canada, and we get to know biologist Dale Rollins’s passion to save Texas quail. Walter Matia shows his love of the outdoors through his magnificent work with bronze. Rebecca Gray takes us up the East Coast to enjoy Slow Food dishes prepared by Chef Doug Mack in Vermont while Fred Minnick gives us some campfire cocktails to try. And if you were wondering, yes, Doc Blythe finishes our August/September adventure with some good ole advice on dogs and mental health. I hope you enjoy.” 
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Vol. 2 Num. 4
Vol. 2 Num. 4
Covey Rise

Vol. 2 Num. 4

$ 8.00

Vol. 2 Num. 4 – June/July 2014

From the Publisher: “This issue has multiple ties to the West Coast with feature stories on Dancing Hares Vineyard and the breeding and nesting habits of California quail. We have a road trip from Montana to Canada with Dale Spartas, and Gregg Elliott talks a little German history while we learn about today’s Merkel. To go along with the majestic cover, our dog feature this issue is on the Lab. We also offer tips on dog training and canine first aid. Next, we travel to Augusta to join Chef Kent Rathbun as he entertains the masses at this year’s Masters Golf Tournament with his culinary flair, while fine artist Christine Coombs gives us descriptions of her world of art. Roger Catchpole and Terry Allen offer a fresh look at a quail plantation back in operation in Albany, Georgia; and Fred Minnick shares some brands of rye whiskey to sip while remembering the past. This summer issue is full of entertaining reading (and viewing), while we all patiently wait and restlessly dream about the next hunting season.” 

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Vol. 2 Num. 3
Vol. 2 Num. 3
Covey Rise

Vol. 2 Num. 3

$ 8.00

Vol. 2 Num. 3 – April/May 2014

From the Publisher: “We have an exciting lineup of photography and stories for you in this issue. Pour your favorite beverage and find that cozy place to relax and enjoy these exceptional pages. We start off with some high-flying birds and great company in North Yorkshire, England. Then we travel to the Rockies for a dude-ranch experience on horseback at The High Lonesome Ranch, and after that get a visual expression of one bird species seeking love during mating season. Gregg Elliott puts us at the oak table as he describes two vintage British shotguns. Bob White paints us a covey of art like you have never seen. Nancy Anisfield introduces us to the colorful vizsla and Tom Keer gives us some tips on teaching and learning new tricks with our favorite companion(s). We visit Frank Stitt at one of his four restaurants in Alabama for some outstanding fare and Fred Minnick gives us info on bourbon trends in this new year. Gary Lewis delivers some roosters for lunch and Doc Blythe gives us something, well, to chew on till next issue. Enjoy.” 

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Vol. 2 Num. 2
Vol. 2 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 2 Num. 2

$ 8.00

Vol. 2 Num. 2 – February/March 2014

From the Publisher: “I was fortunate to spend a couple days in New York City in December, for the MIN and FOLIO Awards. MIN stands for Magazine Information Network and is one of the leading trade organizations reporting on the business of magazine publishing. FOLIO gives out The Eddie and Ozzie Awards that celebrate innovation in design and editorial. It was humbling to find out that Covey Rise was nominated for the Best Magazine Launch for 2013; Best Design, New Magazine, and Best Use of Illustration for Consumer Magazines with Circulation Under 250,000. It was astounding to be there in person when the award-winners were announced. Covey Rise was the winner of Best Use of Illustration and placed second in the other two categories!

I can’t thank you, our readers and our staff, enough; and I also credit the incredible support we’ve received from advertisers. Together, you’ve made this magazine a reality. I say once again, humbly and sincerely, thank you!” 

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Vol. 2 Num. 1
Vol. 2 Num. 1
Covey Rise

Vol. 2 Num. 1

$ 8.00

Vol. 2 Num. 1 – December/January 2014

Let me start by saying two important and sincere words: Thank you. What a year it has been for Covey Rise! This is our First Anniversary issue of the magazine in its new format and it comes with a big “thank you” to you, the reader. Each issue, Covey Rise is published with you foremost in mind. Our articles and images are intended to heighten your fun, enjoyment, and appreciation of upland hunting, wherever you live and get outdoors. I hope this first year of the magazine has been more than you expected; it sure was for us. 

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Vol. 1 Num. 6
Vol. 1 Num. 6
Covey Rise

Vol. 1 Num. 6

$ 8.00

Vol. 1 Num. 6 – October/November 2013

There is nothing quite like a pheasant hunt at Paul Nelson Farm in South Dakota. We hope you enjoy the story as much as we did the visit. From there, in this issue we head south to the Plantation Wildlife Arts Festival in Thomasville, Georgia, which you don’t want to miss. We also spend some time enjoying the contributions two families have made to the upland sport, one with exceptional habitat and vision in Mississippi and the other with a history of fine gunmaking in Italy. As always, we will sample some good food and have a taste of Irish Whiskey while we take you back to an era during which one enjoyed the upland lifestyle in his own way. 

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Vol. 1 Num. 5
Vol. 1 Num. 5
Covey Rise

Vol. 1 Num. 5

$ 8.00

Vol. 1 Num. 5 – August/September 2013

Join us this issue as we travel to Oxford, Mississippi, and visit with Mike Stewart and his fabulous dogs on our way to the Blue Ridge Mountains and enjoying the breathtaking views at Primland. Head south and enjoy some fine fare at Pine Creek and taste some rare bourbon with Fred Minnick. We look back at an ole witty hunter gone by, Gene Hill, and read about one still going in Montana (Ben O. Williams). 

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Vol. 1 Num. 4
Vol. 1 Num. 4
Covey Rise

Vol. 1 Num. 4

$ 8.00

Vol. 1 Num. 4 – June/July 2013

Our journey this issue takes us to several great places from one end of the country to the other. We start our with a Perkins family tradition in Montana. Then we head to south Georgia for a traditional Southern quail hunt at Pine Hill Plantation; to Vermont for some shooting instruction with Lars Jacob; and to Boston for some fabulous bistro fare with a French twist, courtesy of Chef Gordon Hamersley. 

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Vol. 1 Num. 3
Vol. 1 Num. 3
Covey Rise

Vol. 1 Num. 3

$ 8.00

Vol. 1 Num. 3 – April/May 2013

In this issue we’ll share stories about T. Boone Pickens and Bob Williamson, and we’ll go back in time with a similarly minded family, the Berettas. We’ll visit a Utah artist considered and adopted son of south Georgia, and we’ll trudge through the Alaskan tundra in search of ptarmigan. Cowboy Chef Lenny, aka the Black Mamba, and Doc Blythe add some spice too.  

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Vol. 1 Num. 2
Vol. 1 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 1 Num. 2

$ 8.00

Vol. 1 Num. 2 – February/March 2013

In this issue, we travel across the pond with our newest contributing writer, Terry Wieland, who takes an intimate look inside Holland & Holland. In Texas, Covey Rise drops in on the home of Tito’s Vodka and visits Greystone Castle, a picturesque sportsman’s paradise. Along the Gulf Coast, award-winning celebrity chef Tim Creehan shares his tasty recipes, and from the Northeast, our friend Tom Keer tells the story of his transplanted Yankee Cover dog. Also, Don McKenzie of the National Bobwhite Conservative Initiative explores the potential of the new Bobwhite Foundation, while Dr. Blythe will leave you smiling with his tale of Old Doc Foshee.  

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Vol. 1 Num. 1
Vol. 1 Num. 1
Covey Rise

Vol. 1 Num. 1

$ 49.99

Vol. 1 Num. 1 – Premier Edition, December/January 2013

The Premier Edition of Covey Rise Magazine includes contributions from well-known writers like Gary Lewis, Jim Casada, Ben O. Williams and Tom Keer.

Inside this issue learn more about the beautiful upland hunting companion, the Springer Spaniel. Then take a look inside Joshua Creek Ranch. Learn about the heritage of artisan gunmakers, Caesar Guerini. Tag along with the ladies from Kevin's Fine Outdoor Gear and Apparel as they explore the Estancia Cortaderas in Argentina. Enjoy an illustrated essay, Wingshooting the Quail of North America featuring the works of John and Jim Denney. Then head north to New Brunswick for a walk alongside the ghost of Edmund Davis.  

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Covey Rise

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Our 2 Year Subscription offer includes a complimentary Covey Rise blaze hat.  

 

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