2019 | Covey Rise

Vol. 7 Num. 1
Vol. 7 Num. 1
Covey Rise

Vol. 7 Num. 1

$ 10.00

DECEMBER - JANUARY 2019 ISSUE

As we approach the holidays, many of you continue to brave the breaks and briers in search of upland birds. We applaud your efforts and hope the stories in this December-January issue inspire you to celebrate our traditions through the remainder of the season. Starting with this issue’s cover by John Hafner, the determined Labrador shows the same inspiration we’ve come to expect from our bird dogs on every hunt.

Beautifully described in “Season of Grouse,” Roger Catchpole traverses over 11,000 miles chasing various species from the Montana prairies, Maine forests, and the moors of England. “Whether it’s the inaccessibility of grouse habitats or the rarity of the experience, a force draws me to seek grouse-hunting opportunities,” he writes. This mysterious force will elicit an unmatched sense of passion for the uplands throughout the pages of this issue.

Marcus Janssen explores our gunning roots by revealing the “Two Gun Tango” of double gunning for driven game. As Marcus states, “Good double gunning is a skill that requires a sound understanding between both the shooter and loader . . . an experienced partnership has an almost rhythmic timing, not dissimilar to an accomplished ballroom dance.” Watch the step-by-step process almost literally shoot off the pages through the illustrations by Frederick Stivers.

We are reminded to live every day in a positive and healthy way through Oliver Hartner’s article featuring Executive Chef Rachel Hogan, whose days battling Lyme disease inspire her to have as many outdoor adventures as possible. Her holistic lifestyle helps her live one sunrise, one hunt, and one scrumptious meal at a time. 

Just in time for holiday preparations, Jordan Mackay urges us to refresh by the fire with a fine white wine, Fred Minnick parses through the brutal battle between vodka and whiskey, and Chuck Holland discusses how the Nicaraguan political turmoil may affect cigar availability. Through all this, Frank keeps our ethos in check, reminding us to be thankful for all we have this holiday season.

Take a break from life’s responsibilities, be thankful for our hunting opportunities, grab this issue of Covey Rise, and get lost in the upland lifestyle. We hope you enjoy!

Cover photo by John Hafner

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Vol. 7 Num. 2
Vol. 7 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 7 Num. 2

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FEBRUARY - MARCH 2019 ISSUE

Covey Rise has set the high-bar standard for storytelling, and each issue is a book melding the words and images that evoke the totality of your upland experiences. Our stories unfold through poetic words on paper acting in concert with stunning color photography and illustrations. Our professional storytellers have a passion to communicate both innovative and classic upland tales.

This February-March Covey Rise issue is a great example of our continuing standard, starting with “In the Shadows of Giants” by Reid Bryant. His intricate words describe how Ronnie Smith, Jr. and his family continue their own established standard for producing excellence in bird dogs. And this quote does nothing less than draw you in to learn what comes next: “As Ronnie, Susanna, Gage, and Reagan converged at the pasture gate to lay a course for the day, they too were teasing a tradition of fine bird dogs out of a rich past and into an unfolding future.”

Continuing the theme of innovative storytelling, Marcus Janssen’s article on the famed artist Alice Arnold shows the power of stories told in a different medium. “Almost a decade ago, Arnold forged her identity in the sporting art world—portraying wildlife against plain backgrounds on raw linen canvases with lots of negative space around them. But the negative space somehow highlights the poised energy of our quarry species, and the twitchy, staccato movement you associate with red-legged partridge and pheasant in particular.”

Conservation is always at the forefront of the Covey Rise agenda, and Fred Minnick’s comprehensive depiction of Ashbourne Farms combines conservation, fine cuisine, and the uplands all in one. Fred quotes the owner of Ashbourne Farms, Austin Musselman: “To bring back quail is really an accomplishment. Quail is our main interest, and what’s good for quail is also good for other nongame animals like migratory songbirds, and for pollinators like butterflies and bees.” The conservation-minded ethos of the Ashbourne Farms proprietors is also reflected in the food they serve and the mindset of the guests who set foot on their grounds.

Our storied columns, once again, provide the framework for readers to further their upland lifestyle. Renowned storyteller, Ben O. Williams, urges us to capture our memories in photographs, David Zumbaugh stresses the connection between upland habitat and water quality, and Frank finishes with a heartfelt tale that brings us to tears.

From the unique hunting adventures to the optimum updates on food and spirits, please enjoy this issue of Covey Rise, and rest assured that our standard for best storytelling continues.

Cover by Lee Thomas Kjos

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Vol. 7 Num. 3
Vol. 7 Num. 3
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Vol. 7 Num. 3

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APRIL - MAY 2019 ISSUE

The next time you are blessed with the opportunity to be afield, pay attention to your ears for a moment. Listen, and you’ll hear the inherently iconic sounds of the hunt—the deep clanking of the dog bell, the calm command of a “whoa,” the sudden burst of wings as they beat against prairie grass, and the sharp bang of the shotgun. These sounds often please the ear, trigger past memories, and inspire future stories to be told.

In this issue, we explore moments of silence from the field and beyond. As we grow old and reflect upon hunts passed, yearning to venture afield again, it is these cherished times of tranquility we will remember forever.

Chuck Holland’s piece “Later Than You Think” from this issue of Covey Rise inspires us to capture and revisit these special moments. “Enjoy each cigar,” Holland writes. “You never know which one may be your last.”

Reid Bryant continues the theme of calm reflection with his piece “A Hill Country Stillness,” as he describes the allure of Joshua Creek Ranch in Texas. “Indeed, there are birds, in number and style to suit the most discriminating sportsman. And certainly, there are amenities, details attended to, and all needs met, if not exceeded. But there is a magic here that is seemingly not manmade, something special in this place that the Kerchevilles understood all those years ago,” Bryant writes.

Rigby, the revered London gunmaker, is featured by Marcus Janssen, who describes its young leader, Marc Newton, as something of a paradox. “He exudes wisdom and the kind of confidence that only comes with age. And yet, he is, to my knowledge, the youngest managing director of an English gunmaking firm today—possibly ever. He is a traditionalist with a deep respect for the old ways, yet he is dynamic, creative, and adaptable. He thinks both inside the box and outside of it.”

In her piece “Belonging to the Land,” Rachael McLendon brings readers to the wild west of Wyoming to meet a man of noble blood, and a unique story, at his renowned property named Canyon Ranch. “He stomped the snow off his boots and carried more papers and notebooks under his arm to show me. He had returned to Canyon Ranch many years before, not for a title or wealth, but because the tug of home was tenacious for him. The Lord of this castle fixed the fences and maintained all the homes and barns, with contentment being his greatest wealth.”

As we approach the off season, find your quiet place, maybe on your porch or next to a warm fire, and indulge in the virtues of fine storytelling—let the silent reflection describe the magic, tradition, and contentment that can be found on every page of Covey Rise.

Cover by Andy Anderson

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Vol. 7 Num. 4
Vol. 7 Num. 4
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Vol. 7 Num. 4

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JUNE - JULY 2019 ISSUE

Summer is the season where our anticipation for the uplands becomes palpable—where the thoughts and feelings of donning our game vest or gripping our trusty shotgun become so intense that they seem almost tangible.

And, this June/July issue of Covey Rise does nothing short of fostering that special anticipation we carry for guns, dogs, friends, and the hunt in the most remarkable of ways.

Oliver Hartner starts by reminding us how special camaraderie is to the hunt—fireside after a long day, sharing stories as hours pass in the dark—in his article “Mountain Majesty,” featuring Primland in Virginia. “After dinner, a nightcap at the 19th Hole lasted well into the evening for many of us, and for others it stretched until last call—all of us grasping for a few last moments with new friends before having to return home . . . an intense spirit of gratitude occupied every inch of my soul—gratitude for the opportunity to experience such splendor and encounter such fine people,” Oliver writes.

Our bird dogs are talented memory makers and storytellers who know the birds better than we do and are the reason we travel so many miles to hunt. This is exquisitely explained by Nancy Anisfield in her piece “Sensory Delight” where she takes a unique approach—asking writers Gregg Elliott, Reid Bryant, and Mike Halleran to spin their wordsmithing skills to describe the sounds, sights, and feelings that resonate from bird dogs and upland hunting.

The recipe for a good hunt—one that embraces the challenge of wingshooting—is an intricate and soulful mixture of preparation, determination, skill, and finish. For Tim Kaulfers, head chef at Arista Winery, his recipe for a good meal starts in the soil and always brings with it a sense of nolstagia. In his article “Starts in the Garden,” Jordan Mackay quotes Tim: “To me, this is the best job. I get to help people become aware of what they’re eating and where it comes from, showing them how a garden becomes a meal.”

This issue also covers artistic pioneers, such as author Guy de la Valdène, silversmith Clint Orms, and Alex Aranzabal of AYA Fineguns, and our columns from Ben O. Williams, Fred Minnick, Frank, and others never disappoint.

While you take a break during this busy summer—hopefully with your favorite cold drink and a cigar—we hope you enjoy this Covey Rise issue—the stories will bring you to that special moment of reflection, thinking about the anticipation, camaraderie, bird dogs, and the hunt we all strive to experience in the upcoming season.

Cover by Andy Anderson

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Vol. 7 Num. 5
Vol. 7 Num. 5
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Vol. 7 Num. 5

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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2019 ISSUE

The pages of Covey Rise have always upheld the utmost of our sporting traditions, and this issue is no different. Whether it is a challenging hunt, a hard-earned meal, the celebratory cigar, or just the overall lifestyle we live, we are proud to bring you the stories that uphold a reverence to these important traditions now and glorify them into the future.

The article “A Vision for the Future,” by Marcus Janssen, showcases this principle by describing how Johann Fanzoj gunmakers bring their centuries of heritage to produce innovative—some call them avant-garde—shotguns using modern technology. In this piece, Daniela Fanzoj was quoted as saying: “Traditional, age-old crafts will only survive if you embrace the present. We want to stay true to our roots, to use our heritage and knowledge that has been garnered through eight generations, while combining it with the advantages of the 21st Century. This is where the masterpieces of the future will come from.”

Andrew Bogan’s “Hunting the Hashknife” features a Project Zinfandel charity hunt that not only spotlights the practice of bringing game to the table, but also supports society in a most honorable way. Bogan describes the importance of the hunt: “We were at the Hashknife to face the challenge of the hunt and bring its bounty to the table, to overcome adversity and to celebrate success. Most importantly, we were there in support of children with Down syndrome and a charity that helps them and their families to overcome adversity and celebrate their successes. My hope is that this serves as a powerful reminder to those of us who are fortunate enough to own hunting properties to use that privilege to support a wide variety of charitable causes across this great land.”

Roger Catchpole captures the passion for the hunt and the upland lifestyle at Fishing Creek Farms in Georgia in his article “Forming Tradition at Fishing Creek,” where he explains how the proprietors capitalized on their farm beginnings to accentuate an aura of family on their grounds for patrons who visit. He explained his sentiment: “Being one of the fortunate few to have hunted at Fishing Creek during its inaugural year and each subsequent season, I have witnessed firsthand the remarkable rise of this unique facility...what is perhaps most significant is that Fishing Creek has retained a private family atmosphere and exclusive use approach.”

Whether you are new to the hunting scene, a longtime and hardcore uplander, or you simply live vicariously through the pages of this very magazine, the generational differences between hunter experiences are not as diverse as they may seem. Take advantage of the knowledge and traditions that have brought us here as a hunting culture and let those core values perpetuate our practices as we move forward. The season is near, and we certainly hope you make the most of it.

Cover by Chip Laughton

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Vol. 7 Num. 6
Vol. 7 Num. 6
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Vol. 7 Num. 6

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OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019 ISSUE

This October-November issue showcases the many facets of the true art of our upland lifestyle—crucial characteristics that tell the whole story of the hunt for us to celebrate this season. 

Singer-songwriter Chris Janson’s dedication to his family and the outdoors are true passions that fuel and inspire him to entertain audiences at country music’s highest level. His story, from pond fishing with his son to entertaining thousands of fans at the Grand Ole Opry, is vividly told in the article “Days Afield and Opry Nights” through the writing of Miles DeMott and photography of Heather Durham.

When you hunt this fall, try to stop and appreciate the whole story—the wonderful complexity of the landscape and the personalities of your partners that surround you. In his article “Forest for the Trees,” Reid Bryant describes an October morning in the Northwoods of Minnesota that reveals intricate treasures from moments that are seemingly nondescript. “I tried in my mind’s eye to imagine that sweep of autumn woodland as the sum of its tiny parts: of popple whips and fallen leaves, of earthworms and drumming logs, of muddy footprints and the memories of shots long since taken, and long since made or missed.”

Some artists and hunters understand and appreciate the traditions bestowed upon us by our forefathers, and Gregg Elliott, in his article “Made Old Again,” describes how Kade Gile does just that by restoring old gun cases with precise, historical accuracy. “Every old gun case has a story to tell, and every time Kade works on one, he uncovers part of its tale,” Gregg wrote. “One hundred years from now, someone may recognize Kade’s work, too. If they do, they’re sure to be impressed not only by his thoughtfulness for restoring cases to their historical period, but also by the detailed and artful hand of his high-quality work.”

Cover by Heather Durham

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