2020 | Covey Rise

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Vol. 8 Num. 1
Vol. 8 Num. 1
Covey Rise

Vol. 8 Num. 1

$ 12.99

DECEMBER - JANUARY 2019 ISSUE

We all understand that cold winds are inescapable at this time of year. But wintry conditions should never impede our ability to enjoy the upland traditions for which we live. During your downtime during the holidays, get comfortable with this issue of Covey Rise next to the fire and live the lifestyle through the best stories the uplands have to offer.

The holiday season is ideal for thinking about warmer climates and planning your next great upland adventure. In “Paradise Found,” author Oliver Hartner describes quail hunting in Argentina with Will and Lauren Cowan, owners of HookFire Adventure Travel and Safaris. Will was quoted as saying, “In these valleys, there are rivers no human has ever fished, and quail that’ve never heard a shotgun. This is one of the most genuine places you’ll ever see. I’ve seen a dreamy look in people’s eyes when they talk about places like this.”

A new legislative session is right around the corner, and in “The Politics of Gun Dogs,” Nancy Anisfield describes the dog-related bills that matter to our legacy and urges us all to get involved to make a difference. “When it comes to how most of us feel about our gun dogs, the word ‘passionate’ has no ambiguity,” Nancy wrote. “We live that passion, and with vigilance, we can preserve the right to pursue it.”

These fireside stories are even better with your favorite whiskey, cigar, or wine. Or, consider preparing a Covey Rise recipe for the Christmas table. In this issue, you’ll find wild-game options from renowned chef and author Stacy Lyn Harris, Fred Minnick discusses finding bourbon abroad, and Jordan Mackay describes the allure of drinking big reds in the winter. Last but not least, our “On Point” section features the latest gifts and gear that make perfect presents for our readers.

Cover by Terry Allen

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Vol. 8 Num. 2
Vol. 8 Num. 2
Covey Rise

Vol. 8 Num. 2

$ 12.99

FEBRUARY - MARCH 2020 ISSUE

As the off season approaches, hunters and dogs are relegated to licking the wounds of recovery after roaming many hard-fought miles across the upland landscape. We can’t shake birds from our brains very easily, and unfortunately, time machines don’t exist for hunters who can’t wait. Luckily, Covey Rise is the resource that keeps us living the upland lifestyle all year-round.

The feature, “Down to Dirt,” about wildlife conservation at El Coronado Ranch in Arizona, shows how active management of soil and water supports many species of wildlife and the overall ecosystem of the surrounding region. A little effort on your private lands goes a long way.

Miles DeMott’s “Primary Player” showcases Steve Barnett’s role in the secondary fine-gun market. Inside the doors of Steve’s unassuming store in a small Mississippi town, gun collectors can rest assured that the finest guns in the world pass through his hands.

Shooters in the United States and the United Kingdom share a passion for shooting, but when we take a closer look at the tradition of driven shooting, the customs and practices contrast and diverge. In his piece, “When in Britain,” Silvio Calabi portrays the myths and misconceptions of shooting driven birds across the pond.

The upland lifestyle never dies, no matter the time of year. From fine food and quality spirits, to the hunt narratives, guns, and gear, utilize the downtime to appreciate the passion that is authentically presented on every page of Covey Rise as a resource to satisfy your upland indulgence every second until the next, long-awaited hunting season. 

Cover by John Scheuermann

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Vol. 8 Num. 3
Vol. 8 Num. 3
Covey Rise

Vol. 8 Num. 3

$ 12.99

APRIL - MAY 2020 ISSUE

With everything going on in the world around us these days, what could be better than getting lost in fantastic words and images that celebrate our cherished upland-hunting traditions? This new issue of Covey Rise does just this, bringing you a diverse array of stories from hunting and fishing the lush valleys and quiet rivers of Wyoming to savoring and enjoying wild game and local produce at restaurants in London, England.

The seemingly eternal smile of Johnny Morris, owner of Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s, is a beacon of hope when times looks dire. His generous philanthropy has impacted the future of hunting and fishing in the United States and abroad. We had the pleasure of hunting pheasants with Johnny and hearing his story last fall in South Dakota. 

The chefs and restaurateurs of London have embraced local sourcing of wild game and produce—featuring this cuisine to not only promote fine food but to champion conservation. Patrick Tillard, in his article “London’s Game Plan”, shows how this trend is sweeping from the countryside to the city streets and is important for the future of the dining industry—one that hopefully translates to America, too.

Our beloved gamebirds fascinate us in ways that need to be told, and the springtime rituals of the ruffed grouse are a great example. Bill Buckley’s “Wooing Henrietta” describes how a drumming male grouse proudly puts himself at peril in order to court a mate each year in grand fashion.

Cover by Brian Grossenbacher

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